BCRW’s newly digitized archives of feminist history

Archives

The Feminist Origins of the Barnard Center for Research on Women

As the 1960s drew to a close, a growing chorus of voices within the Barnard community began calling for an official College response to the changes wrought and challenges posed by the Women’s Liberation Movement. After months of impassioned, contentious discussion among students, faculty-members, administrators, and alums, the Barnard Women’s Center, later renamed The Barnard Center for Research on Women, was founded in the fall of 1971.

We are now excited to share a new digital portal featuring public and internal papers from the Center’s inaugural year. The collection documents the fledgling research institution’s attempts to solidify its place within Barnard, define its purpose outside the academy, and achieve full expression of its commitment to women’s dignity, autonomy, and equality. Beneath it all lies a quieter story about individual women, bound as much by friendship as they were by political conviction.

This archive offers a snapshot of feminist history in the 1960s and 1970s, the institutionalization of women’s centers and women’s studies as an academic discipline, and feminist struggles taking place at colleges and universities, in healthcare and social service centers, in political organizations and neighborhood meetings across the country.

We are delighted to share this newly accessible and growing resource with students and scholars of feminist history.

 

This digital portal is a pilot project in BCRW’s digital humanities initiative, and part of an ongoing collaboration with the Barnard Library to provide broader access to BCRW’s rich archives.

Thanks to the Barnard College Committee on Online and On-Campus Learning (COOL) for generous funding, and to Barnard Archivists and Librarians Shannon O’Neill and Martha Tenney, BCRW Community Archivist Che Gossett, Eva Vaillancourt BC ’15, and BCRW Research Assistants Kyara Andrade ’17 and Emma May ’18 for making this project possible.

In the Wake: A Salon in Honor of Christina Sharpe

On February 2nd, 2017, Christina Sharpe, Hazel Carby, Kaiama Glover, Arthur Jafa, and Alex Weheliye gathered on a panel to discuss Sharpe’s new book In the Wake: On Blackness and Being (2016). Below are the stills from the event:

Christina Sharpestudent asking question Panelists Christina Sharpe

What is the Future of Black Lives Under a Kleptocracy? A Lecture by Alicia Garza on Tuesday 4/11

On Tuesday, April 11, BCRW is thrilled to host “What is the Future of Black Lives Under a Kleptocracy?” a lecture by Alicia Garza focusing on the first 100 days of the new administration and what’s at stake for the movement.

Garza’s lecture will be followed by a conversation with the audience moderated by Barnard College Professor Premilla Nadasen. To contribute to the conversation, please submit your questions by Sunday 4/9.

The event will be held on Tuesday 4/11 at 6 PM in the Diana Center at Barnard College.

Join us for a conversation on Black feminist organizing, intersectional coalition building, and insights from the Movement for Black Lives for organizers, students, and scholars building resistance in these times.

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Speaker Bio

Alicia GarzaAlicia Garza is an Oakland-based organizer, writer, public speaker and freedom dreamer who is currently the Special Projects Director for the National Domestic Workers Alliance, the nation’s leading voice for dignity and fairness for the millions of domestic workers in the United States. Garza, along with Opal Tometi and Patrisse Cullors, also co-founded the Black Lives Matter network, a globally recognized organizing project that focuses on combatting anti-Black state- sanctioned violence and the oppression of all Black people.
Since the rise of the BLM movement, Garza has become a powerful voice in the media. Her articles and interviews have been featured in Time, Mic, The Guardian, Elle.com, Essence, Democracy Now!, and The New York Times.

In addition, her work has received numerous recognitions including being named on The Root’s 2016 list of 100 African American achievers and influencers, the 2016 Glamour Women of the Year Award, the 2016 Marie Claire New Guard Award, and as a Community Change Agent at the 2016 BET’s Black Girls Rock Awards.

Most important, as a queer Black woman, Garza’s leadership and work challenge the misconception that only cisgender Black men encounter police and state violence. While the tragic deaths of Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown were catalysts for the emergence of the BLM movement, Garza is clear: In order to truly understand how devastating and widespread this type of violence is in Black America, we must view this epidemic through of a lens of race, gender, sexual orientation and gender identity.