Biographies

Danielle Fox – Women Make Waves: Radio During the Black Arts Movement and Beyond

Danielle Fox, Class of 2017, is studying English and Psychology at Barnard College. She is very grateful to have had the opportunity to speak with two women who inspired their communities over the radio during the Black Arts Movement and beyond. Engaging with Shange’s texts and archive throughout this year have helped Danielle uncover the magic that exists in everyday rituals.

Dyana Williams, radio personality and co-founder of Black Music Month

Cathy Hughes, media personality and radio executive

Carleen Brown, Assistant to Cathy Hughes

Steven G. Fullwood, Assistant Curator at The Schomburg

Megan Williams, Librarian at The Schomburg (Photographs and Prints Division)

Brian DeShazor, Director of Pacifica Radio Archives

Kim F. Hall, Barnard College English and Africana Studies Professor

Tiana Reid, Teaching Assistant to the Worlds of Ntozake Shange seminar

Anne Lanse

Nicole Hines – Black Dance is Black Life: Dianne McIntyre and Black Performance Art  

Nicole is a Junior at Barnard College and an Africana Studies Major. Her experiences in reading Ntozake Shange’s works have changed how she views the power of performing arts as an art form that has the capacity to do cultural work as well as connect with people. Shange’s poetry has inspired Nicole to rethink what it means to tell a story and reevaluate the ways we communicate these stories to others.

Dianne McIntyre, for her inspiration

Bradly Treadaway, International Center of Photography

Sarah Greene, Barnard Teaches

Steven G. Fullwood, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Shannon O’Neil, Barnard Archivist

Kim F. Hall, English and Africana Studies Professor

Tiana Reid, Teaching Assistant to the Worlds of Ntozake Shange Seminar

Dania Lewis – In the Times of Mothering Myself: Black Girlhood, Archiving Pain and Healing Through Self-Portraiture

Dania Lewis is an  Africana and Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies Major with a Concentration in Race and Ethnicity who is becoming more comfortable with her artistry. She is brave, afraid, unafraid and truly blessed to have gone on a journey of healing with and through Ntozake Shange.

This project would not have been and could not have been possible without the love of my chosen family, my friends they listened to me rant about my vision.Their love has been inspirational and motivational. They have shown me and taught me to love. To challenge myself to love myself where it hurts the most. The places that are the ugliest to me. The places i wish away, time and time again. This project and my journey to healing and wholesomeness in all in its complexities would not have been possible without the generosity of Ntozake Shange, her art, her poetry, her wisdom, her words. Her words have carried me and kept me alive and have guided me to discover and love myself more and more. Her words keep me hopeful, driven and loved. Her words inspire me to be the best me to myself and the people I love and will love. This project would not have been possible with the generousity, the love, the wisdom, the guidance and the kindness of Professor Kim F. Hall. Time and time again, Professor Hall goes beyond and works overtime. Professor Hall has been an amazing educator, adviser and mentor.

I will forever be grateful and humbled by the love Melissa Louidor has for me.  An acknowledgement is not enough to express the ways in which you have contributed to my growth as an artist, a scholar, and a friend. Thank you for listening to my  very raw and bizzare ideas in the oddest of hours. Thank you being a writing partner when I am in need. Thank you for reminding me to eat and be kind to myself.  Thank you for contributing your artistry,  your music and your light. I am so blessed to have gone on this journey with you.

Thank you, Tiana Reid. You are a nurturing and patient educator. Thank you for your guidance and listening ear.

Amanda Perry. You are gift and I have to remind myself that I am worthy of your friendship and kindness. Thank you for agreeing to have me photograph you as you create your art.

Thank you to Thando Mlambo for opening your home for artistic sharings and creations as well being a supportive artist.

A thank you to  Marc Jeremy  for their excitement when I shared my very raw vision of a performance piece, encouraging me to do it as well videoing it.

Photographic Subject/Friends/Family: Tiffany Traille, Jahmone Perry, Malika Young, Kadra Wright, Melissa Louidor, Amanda Perry, Danielle Fox (Voice recording)

Additional Photographers: Marc Jeremy and Mikiko Thelwell

The Black Girl Movement Conference

Camille Brown, for her inspiration

Sarah Greene, Barnard Teaches

Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College Archivist

Martha Tenney, Barnard College Archivist

Bradley Treadaway, International Center for Photography

Steven G. Fullwood, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Lorna Simpson

Carrie Mae Weems

Mickalene Thomas

Thank you to the many people who have inspired me in the smallest ways and  all the love that I cannot list that has been inspirational.

Mei Suet Loo – Archival Futurity: Our Visions Through Third World Women’s Archives

Mei Suet Loo, who also goes by Michelle colloquially, is an Urban Studies major, concentrating in American history. She is committed to learning from, and building and working with her peers, aunties, and younger cousins in her life projects. Shange’s work in navigating, describing, and imagining diasporic histories and futures has inspired her to process these realities through art.

Smith College Archivists

Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College Archivist

Jenna Freedman, Barnard College Zine Librarian

Well Woman Office

Emile Askey, Columbia University Photography Professor

Time to Greezers – Clarke, Natasha, Jazmin, Sarika, Dunni, Morgan, Katie, Janine, Yuen, Michelle, Lili, Jahshana, Myra.

Melissa Louidor – The Hallowed Breath of Life

Melissa Louidor, a self-described sun goddess, is a double WGSS and Africana Studies Major. Her love of literature drew her to this course and a passion for storytelling through dance and writing has driven her creative investments. Melissa enjoys writing haikus and long journal entries about food. While she has always looked forward to a career as a writer or professor, she has recently undergone a consciousness reawakening and hopes to someday become a flamenco dancer. Through Shange, she has discovered god in herself and in all the beauty that brings joy to life.

Peer artists and collaborators: Dania Lewis, Thando Mlambo, Yadira Capaz

Bradly Treadaway, International Center for Photography

Kim F. Hall, English and Africana Studies Professor

Tiana Reid, Teaching Assistant to the Worlds of Ntozake Shange Seminar

Rebecca Bliss

Sydnie Mosely, BCRW Artist in Residence

Vanessa Valdés

Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College Archivist

Martha Tenney, Barnard College Archivist

Sarah Green, Barnard Teaches

The unseen spirits

Nadia Mbonde – A Daughter’s Cosmography

Nadia Naomi Mbonde, class of 2017, is an Africana Studies major and Dance minor. Nadia’s interactions with Ntozake Shange through the archives, literature, and in-person radically impacted the way she understands her own identity as a dancer, scholar, artist, daughter and diasporan.

Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College Archivist

Holly A. Smith, Spelman College Archivist

Kassandra Ware, Spelman College Archives Assistant

Barnard Student Make-up Artists: Simone Folasayo Ige, Annya Serkovic, Imani Bishop, Ornella Friggit

Barnard Student Photographers: Dina Asfaha, Anta Touray, Ornella Friggit, Yemisi Olorunwunmi, Valerie Jaharis

Kiani Ned – MANIFESTO AND METHODS OF THE ARCHIVAL BODY

Kiani Ned is majoring in Art History with a Visual Arts concentration at Barnard College. She first encountered Ntozake Shange through “for colored girls” and continues to engage with the work of Shange in her artistic practice, on daily walks, in the kitchen, and in her connections with other folks grappling with what it means to be alive and tender.

Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College Archivist

Martha Tenney, Barnard College Archivist

Oluwayemisi Olorunwunmi – Laying the Foundation for New Institutions: The Artist’s Approach to Black Justice

Yemisi Olorunwunmi, Columbia College Class of 2018, is a Nigerian immigrant from Boston, Massachusetts majoring in Political Science, African Studies, and Creative Writing. Much of her work has been analyzing the consequences and partnerships that exist as a result of Ntozake Shange’s art. Through her professional careers in photography, poetry, and peacebuilding, Yemisi has had the opportunity to build bridges between places and people with the aim of reconstituting the black being as a celebrated entity.

God

The Students of The Worlds of Ntozake Shange: The Art of Digital Storytelling Class

Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College Archivist

Martha Tenney, Barnard College Archivis

Steven G. Fullwood, Assistant Curator at the Schomburg

Sarah Greene, Barnard Teaches: Real Place + Digital Access

Bradly Treadaway, International Center of Photography

Kim F. Hall, English and Africana Studies Professor

Tiana Reid, Teaching Assistant to the Worlds of Ntozake Shange Seminar

Vanessa Valdes

The Mellon Foundation

Amanda Perry – When Poetry Meets Paint: An Interrogation of the Collaborative Effort

Amanda Perry, class of 2017, is a painter from the Bronx, NY majoring in Africana Studies and minoring in Art History. Ntozake Shange’s work has increased Amanda’s investment in and curiosity about intergenerational communication as a means of passing down traditions of healing & survival.

Kim Hall,Barnard College English and Africana Studies Professor

Ntozake Shange

Bradly Treadaway, International Center of Photography

Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College Archives

Martha Tenney, Barnard College Archives

Steven G. Fullwood, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture

Lara Saget, Barnard College Art History Department

Sophia Richards: Print Media and Black Feminisms in 1979

Sophia Richards is a sophomore English major at Barnard College who regularly works in theatre, fashion, and all forms of printed matter. She applied to this course with an intense love of Toni Morrison disenchanted by the absence of black women in her life, and is so grateful for the work of Shange and her classmates which has steadily unwound her heart. Shange’s notion of “carnal intellectuality” rewrote Sophia’s relationship with academia, and she hopes that the further dissemination of her poetry will allow women to form new and confident ties between their intellect and the nappy edges of themselves and the world.

Jenna Freedman, Barnard College Zine Librarian

Che Gossett, Community Archivist at BCRW

Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College Archivist

Kim F. Hall, English and Africana Studies Professor

Tiana Reid, Teaching Assistant to the Worlds of Ntozake Shange Seminar

Steven G. Fullwood, Assistant Curator at the Schomburg

Shawnta Smith, Archivist at the Lesbian Herstory Archives

Sherley Olopherne, author of zine “Black lesbians in the 80’s and before”

Susie Gilligan at the Feminist Majority Foundation

The Lesbian Herstory Archives

The Feminist Majority Foundation

Gabrielle Smith – When Poetry Meets Paint: An Interrogation of the Collaborative Effort

Gabrielle Smith is an African Studies major at Barnard College and will be graduating this year. She continues to write and perform poetry throughout the city. The love for storytelling brings her to Shange’s work in particular. Her experience in the archive, International Center of Photography and Schomburg are ones that she’s excited to share with you. She hopes to eventually publish her own work and she says Ntozake Shange plays a large role as to why.

Kim F. Hall, English and Africana Studies Professor

Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College Archivist

Steven G. Fullwood, Assistant Curator at the Schomburg

Sarah Greene, Barnard Teaches: Real Place + Digital Access

Clarke Wheeler – This Would Change Over Time: Archived Revisions of Black Arts and Feminisms

Clarke is a senior from Washington, D.C., double majoring in Political Science and Africana Studies at Barnard College. Through engaging with Shange’s work, Clarke reflects on her own raced, classed, and gendered experiences both at home and abroad, and interrogates her identities, beliefs, and customs within diasporic and ancestral contexts. She looks forward to graduating, and finding new spaces where she can expand and thrive.

Shannon O’Neill, Barnard College Archivist

Steven G. Fullwood, Assistant Curator at the Schomburg  

Alexsandra M. Mitchell, Reference Librarian and Archivist at the Schomburg