Diana Center, Barnard College, 3009 Broadway, New York, NY 10027
Feb 16, 2018 | 6:00PM

S&F Conference: Subverting Surveillance: Strategies to End State Violence

Simone Brown, Dylan Rodriguez, Nandita Sharma, and Dean Spade

Description Program Description This year’s Scholar and Feminist Conference will bring together a broad community of thinkers and organizers to grapple with the ever-deepening penetration of surveillance practices into everyday life, and ways to engage in self-defense against the militarized, racist police state’s demands for constant access in the name of “security” and public order. […]

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borders, Deportation, immigration, police, prison, self-defense, state violence, surveillance, technology

Event Oval, The Diana Center, 3009 Broadway New York, New York
Oct 10, 2017 | 6:00PM

Homes for All, Cages for None: Housing Justice in an Age of Abolition

Christina Heatherton and Craig Willse

In 2016, the Barnard Center for Research on Women assembled a Poverty Working Group to examine the state’s neglect and abandonment of poor people, people of color, and people with disabilities. The group asks how can we deepen our understanding of and resistance to the ways that the neoliberal state and racialized, classed, gendered, and […]

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Christina Heatherton, Craig Willse, homelessness, neoliberalism, poverty, public housing, state violence, surveillance

Scholar and Feminist Online 13.3 - 14.1
Fall 2016

Traversing Technologies

Patrick Keilty and Leslie Regan Shade

In “Traversing Technology,” scholars drawn primarily from the arts and humanities offer close readings of the multifaceted histories, consequences, potential adaptations and mutilations of scientific and technical productions. Uniting these diverse sites of inquiry is the necessity of movement in order to understand or act—the refusal of a god’s eye view frozen in one all seeing perspective. The authors refuse a physical/virtual division, as they map the monstrous meanings of suburban homes, dive into scatalogical biopolitical governmentalities, surface the long gendered pre-history of selfie culture, celebrate trans people of color’s poetic stitching of social wounds, trace the frequent construction of Asian Americans as racialized machines, link the prescient wisdom of the Combahee River Collective to the ways internet architecture imperils black lives, generate new opportunities to infect technology with viral feminist knowledges, and offer up the parasite as a model for our relationship to social networks.

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biopolitics, futurity, gender, race, social networks, surveillance, technology