Gender, Empire, and Nationalism

Lab Description Syllabus One Syllabus Two Related Events Faculty


Lab Description

Gender, Empire, and Nationalism
Neferti Tadiar and Anupama Rao, Instructors

This Lab links Prof. Neferti Tadiar’s course, WMST W4303 “Gender, Globalization and Empire,” with Prof. Anupama Rao’s History course, HIST BC3803 “Gender and Empire.” The two courses examine gender and sexuality as an important lens through which to understand questions of empire, colonialism, and anti-colonial nationalism with a focus on the both history of the British Empire and contemporary practices of U.S. empire. Students explore the relationship between ideological and material structures of power and historical experience, and examine the relationship between categories such as race, class, religion, and sexuality in imperial contexts. “Gender, Globalization and Empire” provides a study of the role of gender in economic structures and social processes comprising globalization. “Gender and Empire” brings the perspectives of historians of gender, who have highlighted the importance of issues such as marriage, domesticity, respectability, and of female enfranchisement to the study of imperial governance. Both coures also examine the broad social consequences of these transformations and developments, particularly for marginalized groups and the various theoretical, political, social and cultural ways that women have challenged, resisted and addressed the dire implications of both globalization and empire.

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Syllabus One

BC 3803: GENDER AND EMPIRE

T/TH 2:40-3:55
(SPRING 2013)

PROF. ANUPAMA RAO

arao [at] barnard.edu
OFFICE HOURS: W 2-4PM
OFFICE: 416C LEHMAN (BARNARD)

Teaching Assistants:

  1. Nishant Batsha
  2. Rahul Sarwate

Sections:

This lecture examines gender and sexuality as an important lens through which to understand questions of empire, colonialism, and anti-colonial nationalism. By so doing, the course brings the perspectives of historians of gender, who have highlighted the importance of issues such as marriage, domesticity, respectability, and of female enfranchisement to the study of imperial governance. Students will explore the relationship between ideological and material structures of power and historical experience, and examine the relationship between categories such as race, class, religion, and sexuality in imperial contexts.

In particular, we will examine contentious issues that shaped debates about women and gender including: domesticity; religion and secularism; demands for political rights and citizenship; cultural violence, and sexuality. The lecture course is organized around three broad periods: 1) the development of ideas of domesticity and conjugality in conjunction with the rise of racial states during the nineteenth century; 2) the development of gendered ideologies in colonial locales during the nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries, and 3) the impact of colonial configurations of gender and sexuality in shaping the “woman’s question” during and well after decolonization.  

While the readings for the class target issues specific to gender, class lectures will integrate your readings with historical perspectives on the period under study. Monday lectures will usually situate readings in the period under study, and provide information regarding key social, political, and economic transformations that inflected gender transformations.

Requirements

  • Class participation
  • Attend three evening lectures by authors we will be reading in class
  • Two short three-page comments
  • A final paper of 12-15 pages

Participation

  1. Class Participation-Be prepared to be called upon to explain readings, or to break down into small discussion groups
  2. Attend three evening lectures—February 7; February 26; and April 16. All events will run from 6-8PM. Attendance mandatory.  

Writing

  1. TWO short comments of 3 pages during Weeks 4 (February 13) and 7 (March 11)
  2. Final paper of 12-15 pages due during exam week. We will work through the writing process before final submission.

Note: You will work on this paper by producing a short draft of your paper (Week Twelve); present from a second, improved draft at a student conference (Week Fourteen), and hand in your final paper during exam week.

Details of final paper:

  • Choose among three or four possible paper topics by Week 9. (Topics will be distributed during that week.)
  • Complete a 5-8 page paper draft on Week Twelve. Papers due in class April 18, 2013.
  • Work on the paper in consultation with teaching assistants Nishant Batsha, or rahul Sarwate and with Professor Rao.
  • Present the main points of your paper at a student conference to be held during the final week of our course. (Note: Student conference will be held together with the students from Professor Tadiar’s “Gender, Empire, and Globalization” class.)

What is this draft? Simply put, we would like a short 3-4 page statement from you about:

  • What is your research topic
  • Why do you think it is significant (that is, what kinds of questions and issues does it allow you to explore) 
  • What kind of a methodology will you use and what sources will you draw on (you might have a critical reading in mind, archival research, you may want to interview people)

You should then give us an annotated bibliography of 5-8 sources (a mix of books and essays, in at least equal proportion) that you believe are important for your topic. An annotated bibliography contains a brief precis of the author’s argument, and a note of what information and material s/he draws on. Think of writing at least a paragraph on each of your 5-8 sources that you choose to list. The idea is for us to get a sense of how you are conceptualizing the project, whether you have bound the idea so that you can explore it in 12-15 pages, and to show us that you have begun to think about sources well before paper due date. Newspapers, select online sites (including archival repositories), visual culture, built form, maps, interviews, as well as reliance on key secondary materials are all possible.

Reading Requirement

Student will average about 100 pages/week depending on the difficulty of readings.

Grading Breakdown

Class Participation (15%)
Two short comments (20%)
First draft of paper (20%)
Student Presentation (15%)
Final Essay (30%)

Attendance

  1. I am a stickler for attendance, and for prompt completion of written work.
  2. You are allowed to miss 2 lecture meetings across the semester. Further absences will result in the loss of half a grade per missed class.
  3. You may not miss more than one of your section discussions. Your TAs will be taking attendance
  4. You must attend the mandatory lectures on February 7; February 26, and April 16

If this poses a problem for you, now is the time to rethink your decision to enroll in this course.

Important Dates

  • Thursday, February 7: Public Lecture by Professor Philippa Levine, 6-8 PM
  • February 13: comment due by 8PM
  • Tuesday, February 26: Public Lecture by Professor Melissa Wright, 6-8 PM on February 26, 2013
  • March 7, 2013: comment due by 8PM
  • Tuesday, April 16: Public lecture by Tanika Sarkar in conversation with Afsaneh Najmabadi and others. 6:30-8:30 PM
  • April 16: First draft of papers due in class
  • April 30: Present papers at student conference
  • May 15: Final papers due

Learning Objectives:

This course will familiarize students with major debates in the study of non-Western gender, while providing them with a sense of the interlinkages between gender and intimacy, on the one hand, and large scale socio-political processes on the other.

It will provide students familiar with gender and feminist theory with a sense of how scholars have applied them to specific cases and events. Conversely, it will introduce students with some knowledge of world or global history to the study of gender and sexuality.

Students who complete this course will learn how to:

  1. Use and evaluate primary materials through critical reading and interpretation
  2. Conduct close readings of key texts
  3. Understand the difference between primary materials and historiography
  4. Evaluate divergent perspectives in the understanding of the same event
  5. Interpret arguments in light of existing literature on gender
  6. Gain exposure to the theories and methods of global history
  7. Present arguments cogently and logically in writing and speaking

Readings  

All required books are available for purchase at Book Culture. Materials with a “*” will be posted online.

Required Texts

Luise White, Comforts of Home

Michel Foucault, History of Sexuality

SCHEDULE OF MEETINGS

Week One

January 22, 2013: Introduction

January 24, 2013:

  • Joan W. Scott, “Gender: A Useful Category of Analysis,” American Historical Review, Vol. 91, No. 5 (Dec., 1986): 1053-75 [get via JSTOR on CLIO]
  • Philippa Levine, “Why Gender and Empire?” in Gender and Empire

Week Two: Sexuality and Slavery

January 29, 2013

  • “Women and Unfree Labour in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries” pp.14-37, in Angela Woolacott

January 31, 2013

  • Jennifer Morgan, “Some Suckle Over Their Shoulders”  

Week Three: The Colonial Family

February 5 and 7, 2013

  • Jean Taylor, The Social World of Batavia [excerpts]

Public Lecture by Professor Philippa Levine, February 7, 6-8 PM – Attendance mandatory

Week Four: Culture and the Scandal of Empire

February 12,2013

  • Catherine Hall, “Of Gender and Empire: Reflections on the Nineteenth Century,” in Philippa Levine, ed., Gender and Empire

February 14, 2013

  • Lata Mani, “Contentious Traditions: The Debate on Sati in Colonial India,” Cultural Critique #7, 1987 [get via JSTOR on CLIO]
  • Tanika Sarkar, “Prehistory of Rights,” Gender and History

NOTE: Post short 3-page comment by Wednesday, 2/14 by 8PM

Week Five: History of Sexuality

February 19 and 21, 2013

  • Foucault, History of Sexuality [excerpts]

Week Six: History of Sexuality (contd.)

February 26, 2013

  • Foucault contd.

February 28, 2013

  • Philippa Levine, “Sex, Gender, Empire,” in Gender and Empire

Public Lecture by Professor Melissa Wright, 6-8 PM on February 26, 2013 – Attendance Mandatory

Week Seven: Sex and the (Colonial) City

March 5, 2013

  • Luise White, The Comforts of Home

March 7, 2013

  • No class Thursday: continue reading White

NOTE: Post short 3-page comment by Wednesday, 3/7 by 8PM

Week Eight: Imperial Feminism and Anti-colonial Nationalism

March 12

  • Antoinette Burton, “The White Woman’s Burden,” in Western Women and Imperialism

March 14, 2013

  • Chatterjee, Partha, “Nationalist Resolution of the Women’s Question,” in Sangari, Kumkum and Sudesh Vaid eds. Recasting Women Essays in Indian Colonial in Indian Colonial History.
  • Wang Zheng, “State Feminism”? Gender and Socialist State-Formation in Maoist China, Feminist Studies, Volume 31, No. 3, Fall 2005 [get via JSTOR on CLIO]

***March 16-24, 2013: SPRING BREAK. NO CLASS!!!***

Week Nine: Anticolonial Nationalism

March 26, 2013

  • Abu-Lughod, Lila, “Islamism and Feminism”

March 28, 2013

Week Ten: Other Bodies and the Discourse of Development

April 2, 2013

  • Screening: “Something Like a War”

April 4, 2013

  • Christine J. Walley, “Searching for ‘Voices’: Feminism, Anthropology, and the Global Debate over Female Genital Operations,” Cultural Anthropology 12 #3, 1997 [get via JSTOR]

Week Eleven: The Critique of Liberal Feminism

April 9, 2013

  • Saba Mahmood, The Politics of Piety [excerpts]
  • Valentine M. Moghadam, “Feminists Versus Fundamentalists: Women Living
  • Under Muslim Laws and the Sisterhood is Global Institute”

April 11, 2013

  • Special issue of Gender and History (2011) on “Gender and the Human” [find online via CLIO, then JSTOR]

***First draft of papers due April 11 in class***

Week Twelve: Secularism and the Politics of Community

April 16, 2013

  • Rajeswari Sunder Rajan, “Women Between Community and State: Some Implications of the Uniform Civil Code Debates in India,” Social Text 65, 2001. pp. 55-82 [get via JSTOR on CLIO]

April 18, 2013

  • Joan Scott, “Symptomatic Politics: The Banning of Islamic Head Scarves in French Public Schools,” French Politics, Culture & Society; Winter 2005, Vol. 23 Issue 3, p106-127 [get via JSTOR on CLIO]
  • Guest lecture by Susanna Ferguson (CU graduate student, Middle East history)

Week Thirteen: Empire… Again?

April 23, 2013

  • Jasbir K. Puar, “The Sexuality of Terrorism”
  • Marilyn Young, “Permanent War”

April 25, 2013

  • Ruth Gilmore, “Globalisation and U.S. Prison Growth: From Military Keynsianism to Post-Keynsian Militarism”

Week Fourteen

Student conference Tuesday April 30?

***FINAL PAPERS DUE Wednesday, May 15, 5 PM***

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Syllabus Two

WMST 4303: GENDER, GLOBALIZATION & EMPIRE

Spring 2013
Tuesdays 2:10-4:00 p.m.
Diana Center 501

Professor Neferti Tadiar
Office: 206 Barnard Hall
Email: ntadiar [at] barnard.edu
Phone: 212-854-2564
Office Hours: Wednesdays, 2-4 p.m. by appointment

Course Description

Study of the role of gender in economic structures and social processes comprising globalization and in the political practices of contemporary U.S. empire. We will explore the ways in which transformations in global political and economic structures over the last few decades – including recent political developments in the U.S. – have been shaped by gender, race, sexuality, religion and social movements. We will also examine the broad social consequences of these transformations and developments, particularly for marginalized groups. Finally, we will consider the various theoretical, political, social and cultural ways that women have challenged, resisted and addressed the dire implications of both globalization and empire. Topics for discussion include the feminization of labor; neoliberalism; war and torture; prison-systems and immigration; colonialism; racism and cultural difference; environmental politics; third world feminist movements and transnational social struggles.

CCIS Lab

This course forms part of a Consortium for Critical Interdisciplinary Studies Lab, “Gender and Empire,” organized in tandem with Professor Anupama Rao’s course, BC 3803, “Gender and Empire.” Students from both classes will come together on Weeks 3, 6, and 12 to discuss select readings and to participate in discussion following public lectures by scholars whose work they have read. Students from both courses will also present short papers on thematic panels in the final week of classes.

Course Requirements

  • Students should complete the assigned readings in a timely manner and to come to seminar prepared to discuss them. This is a reading-intensive seminar. To prepare for discussion, you are required to post 1-page weekly responses to the readings on the discussion board on Courseworks. Your responses may highlight a concept, argument or perspective that you find compelling or problematic, pose questions, draw connections among the readings or develop thoughts of your own on a particular issue raised in the assigned material. Responses must be posted by 5 pm on the Monday before class. (Class participation, Weekly responses 25%)
  • Students are required to make one brief oral presentation (10 minutes) on a selected week of readings and to submit a write-up of the presentation on the same day. (Oral and Written Presentation 15%)
  • A midterm take home exam will be given out in the 7th week and is due a week later. Please bring a hard copy to class and post an electronic copy on Courseworks. (30%)
  • A final paper (12-15 pages) on a topic related to the course is due on the last day of class. You must submit a proposal for the topic, no later than the 9th week (after Spring Break). You will give a short presentation on your paper in a mini- conference held on the last week of class. (Presentation and Final Paper 40%)

Required Reading:

  • Silvia Federici, Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction, and Feminist Struggle
    Rhacel Parreñas, The Force of Domesticity: Filipina Migrants and Globalization
    Lisa Duggan, Twilight of Equality: Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy
  • Ruth Gilmore, Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing Capitalism
  • Vandana Shiva, Soil Not Oil: Environmental Justice in an Age of Climate Crisis 

Learning Objectives:

This course will familiarize students with major issues of concern relating to the processes comprising globalization and projects of U.S. empire. It will provide them with a sense of how feminists, anti-racist and queer theorists critically view political and economic developments of the last few decades and their social and cultural consequences in light of ongoing histories of conquest, slavery, colonialism and imperialism.

Students who complete this course will learn how to:

  • Understand and evaluate contemporary economic and political processes through the analytics of gender, race and sexuality
  • Conduct critical analyses of contemporary events within a global and historical purview
  • Make conceptual and historical connections across different social and geographical contexts
  • Gain exposure to the theories and methods of anti-racist, feminist interdisciplinary studies
  • Present arguments cogently and logically in writing and speaking

Required books are available at Book Culture, 112th Street, between Amsterdam and Broadway. Other required readings are available as electronic attachments on Courseworks. Electronic copies must be printed out or downloaded on a device and brought to class on the dates they are assigned.

Reading Schedule

WEEK 1: Introduction

JANUARY 22

WEEK 2: Global Capital, Global Empire

JANUARY 29

  1. Manna-hata http://tequilasovereign.blogspot.com/2011/10/manna-hata.html
  2. Because Not All 99%-ers Are Created Equal http://tequilasovereign.blogspot.com/2011/10/because-not-all-99-ers-are- html
  3. The Difference that History Makes in the OWS Movements http://tequilasovereign.blogspot.com/2011/10/difference-that-history-makes-in-html
  4. Ofelia O. Cuevas, “Welcome to My Cell: Housing and Race in the Mirror of American Democracy”
  5. Spike Peterson, “Rewriting (Global) Political Economy”
  6. Cindi Katz, “On the Grounds of Globalization: A Topography for Feminist Political Engagement”

WEEK 3: Women and Empire, Gender and Globalization

FEBRUARY 5

  • Cynthia Enloe, The Curious Feminist: Searching for Women in a New Age of Empire (Chapters 1,2,4,9)
  • Philippa Levine, “Why Gender and Empire,” and “Sex, Gender, and Empire” in Gender and Empire 

FEBRUARY  7

  • Public Talk: Philippa Levine, “Gender and Empire: Mapping A Field” Sulzberger Parlor, Barnard Hall, 6-8 P.M.

WEEK 4: Gendered Labor

FEBRUARY  12

  • Silvia Federici, Revolution at Point Zero: Housework, Reproduction, and Feminist Struggle
  • Kalindi Vora, “Limits of ‘Labor’: Accounting for Affect and the Biological in Transnational Surrogacy and Service Work”

WEEK 5: Gendered Migration, Gendered Investments

FEBRUARY  19

  • Rhacel Parreñas, The Force of Domesticity: Filipina Migrants and Globalization (Chapters 2, 3, 6)
  • Lamia Karim, “The Everyday Mediations of Microfinance” in Microfinance and Its Discontents: Women in Debt in Bangladesh
  • Julia Elyachar, “Value, The Evil Eye, and Economic Subjectivities” in Markets of Dispossession: NGOs, Economic Development, and the State in Cairo

WEEK 6: Contemporary Legacies of Conquest and Violence

FEBRUARY  26

  • Selections from Julia Sudbury, ed. Global Lockdown: Race, Gender, and the Prison-Industrial Complex
  • Andrea Smith, “U.S. Empire and the War Against Native Sovereignty.”  In
  • Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide
  • Melissa Wright, “Necropolitics, Narcopolitics, and Femicide: Gendered Violence on the Mexico-U.S. Border”
  • FILM: Lourdes Portillo, dir. Señorita Extraviada, Missing Young Woman (Documentary, 2005)

SPEAKER: Melissa Wright, TBA 

WEEK 7: Race, Gender, Incarceration

MARCH 5

  • Ruth Gilmore, Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (Chapters 1-4, 6)
  • Selections from Julia Sudbury, ed. Global Lockdown: Race, Gender, and the Prison-Industrial Complex 

TAKE-HOME MID-TERM EXAM HANDED OUT

WEEK 8: Sexuality, Security, War

MARCH 12

  • Anne McClintock, “Paranoid Empire: Specters from Guantanamo and Abu Ghraib”
  • Jasbir K. Puar, “The Sexuality of Terrorism:”
  • Paul Amar, “Turning the Gendered Politics of the Security State Inside Out?” Elizabeth Bernstein, “Militarized Humanitarianism Meets Carceral Feminism:
  • The Politics of Sex, Rights, and Freedom in Contemporary Antitrafficking Campaigns”

TAKE-HOME MID-TERM EXAM DUE 

MARCH 19: Spring Break

WEEK 9: Neoliberalism and Global Desires

MARCH 26

  • Lisa Duggan, The Twilight of Equality?: Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy (selection)
  • Amy Lind, “’Revolution with a Woman’s Face?’ Family Norms, Constitutional Reform, and the Politics of Redistribution in Post-Neoliberal Ecuador”
  • Kate Bedford, “Cultures of Saving and Loving: Ethnodevelopment, Gender, and Heteronormativity in PRODEPINE” in Developing Partnerships: Gender, Sexuality, and the Reformed World Bank

FINAL PAPER TOPIC DUE

WEEK 10: Politics Of Environment

APRIL 2

  • Kavita Philip, “Nature, Culture Capital, Empire”
  • Andrea Smith, “Rape of the Land” in Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide
  • Vandana Shiva, Soil Not Oil

FILM: “Women of Fukushima”

WEEK 11: Globalizing Human Rights, Humanitarianism

APRIL 9

  • Ilana Feldman and Miriam Ticktin, In the Name of Humanity

WEEK 12: Rights, Religion, Secularity

APRIL 16

  • Melinda Cooper, “The Unborn Born Again: Neo-Imperialism, the Evangelical Right, and the Culture of Life” in Life As Surplus: Biotechnology and Capitalism in the Neoliberal Era
  • Mervat Hatem, “In the Eye of the Storm: Islamic Societies and Muslim Women in Globalization Discourses”
  • Deniz Kandiyoti, “Old Dilemmas or New Challenges? The Politics of Gender and Reconstruction in Afghanistan”
  • Tanika Sarkar, “Prehistory of Rights,” Gender and History

PUBLIC SALON: “Rights, Religion, Secularity”: Tanika Sarkar, Anupama Rao, Neferti Tadiar, Sulzberger Parlor, Barnard Hall, 6:30 P.M. 

WEEK 13: Transnational Movements

APRIL 23

  • Anna Tsing, Part III, “Freedom,” in Friction: An Ethnography of Global Connection (Princeton 2005)
  • Marguerite Waller and Sylvia Marcos, eds. Dialogue and Difference: Feminisms Challenge Globalization (selections)
  • http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/gyasi-/what-is-idle-no-more-_b_2486435.html
  • Kehaulani Kauanui & Patrick Wolfe, “Settler Colonialism Then and Now”

WEEK 14

APRIL 30/ MAY 2

  • Student Presentations

Student Assignment 1

Gender and Empire, Spring 2013

(Batsha, Rao, Sarwate)

Due date: Response due in class Thursday, February 14, 2013.

Requirements:

Papers should be three-four pages; 12 point type; double-spaced; a decent margin around the page. Please proofread your work. Since we have all read the same texts, you can use the citational style of (author, page number) either within your text, or footnotes to support points and arguments. Broad dates and places are sufficient, but necessary for historical context. Please take a look at “how to read and write historical essays” for pointers.

Question:

“The body is a surface on which competing ideas of masculinity and femininity, and thus, of ideas of social power, are articulated/expressed.”

Debate and discussion regarding the control, ornamentation, and reproductive capacity of the female body (to name but a few issues) were central to the making of new creole and mestizo cultures in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. How did broad social and economic processes (e.g., political economy, ideas of race and culture, representations of femininity and the female body) influence the development of the politics of gender, sexuality, and family in the Atlantic World, on one hand, and the Indian Ocean World on the other?

You have two options in crafting your response.

  1. The first is to think comparatively across Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds, and to explore how and why shared social and economic processes, and projects of colonial domination manifest differences. 
  2. The second gives you the option to focus on either Atlantic World slavery or hybrid Batavian society, and to give us a textured sense of the organization of gender, sexuality, and family relations in that space. In case you choose this option, we want you to focus on your primary readings (while drawing on secondary materials and class lecture) to explore the interconnection between the economic order (plantation slavery, or VOC trade), ideas of selfhood (humanitarianism, status hierarchies), representational strategies (travelogues, painting, ethnographic surveys), and emergent contradictions between metropole and colony. Do what extent did they rely on relations of gender, sexuality and family. In turn, what impact did they have on them?  

Student Assignment 2

Gender and Empire, Spring 2013

(Batsha, Rao, Sarwate)

Due date: Response due in class Thursday, March 14, 2013.

Requirements:

Papers should be 4-5 pages; 12 point type; double-spaced; a decent margin around the page. Please proofread your work. Since we have all read the same texts, you can use the citational style of (author, page number) either within your text, or footnotes to support points and arguments. Again, please take a look at “how to read and write historical essays” for pointers.

A central argument in The History of Sexuality concerns the nature and deployment of modern disciplinary power. We will recall that Foucault is particularly concerned with sites such as the school, the family, the prison, and the psychiatrist’s couch where discourses of cure, rehabilitation, and self-regulation provide cover for the exercise of power. His main concern here is to underline the productive, fecund nature of power, and to challenge the “repressive hypothesis.”

In this response, we would like you to draw on your understanding of Foucault’s argument about modern power, and extend it to a consideration of how sex work came to be regulated in colonial Nairobi. Did discourses of sanitation, control of public space, and social hygiene in Nairobi produce a discourse of sexuality in the manner Foucault described for Europe, and if so how? If you believe that such a discourse of sexuality was not produced, why not? Substantiate your argument in either instance by discussing how sex work was regulated (by others) and how it was organized (by the women).

Hint: Because this is a long, detailed, and dense text, you are welcome to take up one particular slice of time—e.g., the period during WWI, the period of wage depression when malaya prostitution changed, or the entry of Kikuyu and other women into the city at the turn of the centur—around which to organize your response.

Keep in mind that whatever period you choose: a) requires you to analyze it as a time when a significant change was underway as regards the lives of women, and b) to discuss the multiple actors (human and non-human!) that were involved in those transformations.

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Related Events

CCIS Lab/ WGSS Speaker Series, “Gender and Empire: Mapping a Field” – 2/7/13

“Feminicidio, Narcoviolence, Profit and the Feminist Fight on Mexico’s Border” – 2/26/13

SALON: Rights, Religion, and Secularity with Tanika Sarkar (video) – 4/16/13

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Faculty

Anupama Rao is Associate Professor of History at Barnard College. Full Faculty Profile

Neferti X. M. Tadiar is Professor and Chair of the Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Barnard College. Full Faculty Profile

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