Annette Gordon-Reed – Without Cover of the Law: Writing the History of Enslaved Women

Drawing on her work about slavery at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, luminary legal historian Annette Gordon-Reed discusses the way law influences the portrayal of enslaved women and their families.

Annette Gordon-Reed is the Carol K. Pforzheimer Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History at Harvard Law School, and a Professor of History at Harvard University. She received the 2008 National Book Award and the 2009 Pulitzer Prize in History for The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family. She is also the author of Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings: An American Controversy, among other titles. Her honors include the National Humanities Medal, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a MacArthur Fellowship.

The first Natalie Boymel Kampen Memorial Lecture in Feminist Criticism & History is in honor of Barnard Professor of History (and longtime BCRW Advisory Board member), Herbert Sloan, author of Principle and Interest: Thomas Jefferson and the Problem of Debt.

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