Theorizing Activisms

Course Description Videos Syllabus 2016 Syllabus 2013 Activist Profiles Faculty Profiles

Course Description

Theorizing Activism
Instructors: Janet Jakobsen and Elizabeth Bernstein

The goal of this course is to understand contemporary forms of activism that situate the politics of gender and sexuality in terms of broader economic and political currents addressed by social justice feminism. Through our readings and conversations, we will trace the connections between the reallocation of various forms of capital, state agendas of incarceration and social reform, the politics of immigration, labor, and housing, new forms of gender inequality, and emergent forms of sexual violence and regulation. Through their own research projects, students will explore activist possibilities for a particularly pressing local, national or global issue.

In the first Critical Inquiry Lab version of the course in 2013, students participated in research conducted with community-based organizations in New York City that are working to address the effects of diverse economic and political transformations.  By partnering with organizations like SAKHI for South Asian Women, Queers for Economic Justice, the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, the Sex Workers’ Outreach Project, and Sydnie L. Mosley Dance, students learned how to conduct research that is of use to the initiatives of local activists. The organizations will share their findings with a transnational group of scholars who are currently part of the Barnard Center for Research on Women’s project on Gender, Justice, and Neoliberal Transformations. Through their research, the students will explore the local impact of economic austerity, while situating these effects in the comparative and synthetic framework of the BCRW’s larger research project.

As the central component of the seminar in the 2016 version students engaged with activists participating in the new Social Justice Institute at the Barnard Center for Research on Women.  These activists have worked in a variety of forms of activism both inside and outside of community-based organizations (mainly in New York City) – community organizing, activist philanthropy, art as activism, direct action, among other forms.  They shared their projects with the students and some of the resources from those projects are shared as part of this digital project.

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Videos

We Move Together: Disability Justice and Trans Liberation (2017)
A Conversation Featuring Patty Berne, Reina Gossett, Kiyaan Abadani, and Malcolm Shanks, moderated by India Harville


Invisible No More: Racial Profiling and Police Brutality Against Women and LGBTQ People of Color (2017)
Featuring Andrea J. Ritchie

 

Don’t Be A Bystander: 6 Tips for Responding to Racist Attacks (2017)

 

Activism in Context: An Intergenerational Dialogue in the Shadow of the 2016 Elections (2016)
A conversation featuring DaMonique Ballou ’17, Katherine Brewster ’71, Rowan Hepps-Keeney ’17, Nadia Mbonde ’17, Janet Price ’71, and Karla Spurlock-Evans ’71, and moderated by Senior Activist Fellow Katherine Acey

 

Queer Liberation: No Prisons, No Borders (2016)
Featuring Reina Gossett, Angélica Cházaro, CeCe McDonald, and Dean Spade

 

I Use My Love to Guide Me: Surviving and Thriving in the Face of Impossible Situations (2014)
A Conversation with CeCe McDonald, Reina Gossett, and Dean Spade

 

Prisons Don’t Keep Us Safe, We Keep Each Other Safe (2014)
A Conversation with CeCe McDonald, Reina Gossett, and Dean Spade

 

Police and Prisons Aren’t Safe for Anybody (2014)
A Conversation with CeCe McDonald, Reina Gossett, and Dean Spade

 

Gender, Justice, and Activisms in New York City (2014)
Video Presentation with NYC Community-based Orgs and Gender Justice Research Team

 

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Syllabus 2016

Theorizing Activism
WMST UN3312
Fall 2016
Professor Janet Jakobsen, 101 Barnard Hall
Office Hours: Tu. 1-2, Fri 1-2

Course Description

The goal of this course is to understand contemporary forms of activism that situate the politics of gender and sexuality in terms of broader economic and political currents addressed by social justice feminism. As the central component of the seminar, students will engage with activists who are participating in the Social Justice Institute at the Barnard Center for Research on Women and have worked in a variety of forms of activism – community organizing, activist philanthropy, art as activism, direct action, among other forms — both inside and outside of community-based organizations (mainly in New York City).  Through our readings and conversations, we will trace the connections between the reallocation of various forms of capital, state agendas of incarceration and social reform, the politics of immigration, labor, and housing, new forms of gender inequality, and emergent forms of sexual violence and regulation. Through their own research projects, students will explore activist possibilities for a particularly pressing local, national or global issue.

Learning Objectives

  1. To be able to analyze modes of contemporary activism in terms of broader social currents—political, economic, and historical.
  2. To situate activism around gender and sexuality intersectionally, considering the impact of particular activist endeavors upon differently situated communities (including those that are stratified by class, age, race, and nation).
  3. To gain facility with critical research methods that will contribute to more effective social and political change.
  4. To gain an understanding of the intellectual work involved in activism.

Requirements:

  1. Class Participation (10 points): The course is a seminar and attendance in class is required.  Preparation for the class sessions will involve multi-media materials produced in both academic and activist settings. Course materials are available on Courseworks or online through the links provided in the syllabus. Each student must read, watch or listen to all of the assigned materials and be prepared to discuss them in class. The course will involve discussion with guest activists, and it is very important that we engage with our guests in a respectful manner that includes being fully prepared to join in the discussion.
  2. Research Project: Each student will produce a major research project on an activist issue of their choosing over the course of the semester.  The student will work on the same topic for the entire semester and will build their analysis along with the reading and class discussions.  Students may incorporate parts of their early papers into their final term paper.  Each piece of the project is due in the Courseworks Dropbox on a Friday at 5:00 PM and the full project is due on Monday, December 12. The deadlines for parts of the research project are:
  3. Paper #1: Framing the Issue (20 points): A 5-7-page paper articulating your topic and framing of the issue. Based on the class discussion of framing you can consider questions such as: How is it framed in mainstream media? In different activist practices? How should it be framed? Due on September 30.
  4. Paper #2: Effective Action (20 points): A 5-7 page paper evaluating different types of activist practice on the issue.  Through research on your issue, provide a brief survey of types of activism addressing your issue. Choose a focus and discuss these practices in relation to our readings and class discussion.  What methods are activists currently using to address the issue (e.g. community organizing, education, media production, dialogue, direct action)? What methods do you want to focus on? Why? Due on November 11.
  5. Final Paper (50 points): A 20-page paper providing a full analysis of the semester’s research, including your analysis of framing and existing practice, as well as an evaluation of ideal or even utopian activism on your issue.  What action related to your issue is most needed to build a more just world? A reframing of the issue? A new approach to activism? More education? More support for existing practices? The paper should draw upon the readings and class discussions, as well as your research on the issue. Due on December 12.

Course Schedule 

Week 1: September 6 – Introduction

Week 2: September 13 – What Is Activism?

  • Catherine Eschle and Bice Maiguashca, “Collective Action: The Political Practices of Feminist Antiglobalization Activists,” Making Feminist Sense of the Global Justice Movement. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2010.
  • Henry Jenkins and Sangita Shresthova, “’It’s Called Giving a Sh**!” What Counts as Politics?” in By Any Media Necessary: The New Youth Activism. New York: NYU Press, 2016.
  • Dean Spade, “Methodologies of TransResistance,” in A Companion to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Studies, ed. George E. Haggerty and Molly McGarry, 237-61. Oxford, Blackwell, 2007.
  • Angela Y. Davis, “Political Activism and Protest from the 1960s to the Age of Obama,” Freedom is a Constant Struggle, 111-27. Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2016. [note give link to speech online]

Week 3: September 20 – Framing an Issue

  • Beth Richie, “The Matrix: A Black Feminist Response to Male Violence and the State,” Arrested Justice: Black Women, Violence and America’s Prison Nation, 125-56. New York: NYU Press, 2012.
  • Emily Thuma, “Lessons in Self-Defense: Gender Violence, Racial Criminalization, and Anticarceral Feminism.” WSQ: Women’s Studies Quarterly (2015), 43.3 & 4: 52-71.
  • Nancy Fraser, “Talking About Needs: Interpretive Contests as Political Conflicts in Welfare-State Societies,” Ethics 99.2 (Jan. 1989): 291-313.
  • Rinku Sen, “Picking the Good Fight,” Stir it Up: Lessons in Community Organizing and Advocacy, 48-78. New York: Jossey-Bass/Ms. Foundation for Women, 2003. 

Week 4: Sept 27 – Changing a Movement
Guest Activist: Tiloma Jayasinghe

  • Incite! Women of Color Against Violence and Critical Resistance, “Statement on Gender Violence and the Prison Industrial Complex.” 
  • Mimi E. Kim, “Moving Beyond Critique: Creative Interventions and Reconstructions of Community Accountability,” Social Justice 37.4 (2011-12): 14-35.
  • Sakhi for South Asian Women Summit, “Preventing Violence, Promoting Justice.” Video.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 – PAPER #1 DUE IN DROPBOX 

Week 5: October 4 – Organizing for Change
Guest Activist: Amber Hollibaugh

Week 6: October 11 – Archives and/as Activism
Guest Activist: Che Gossett

Week 7: October 18 – Conversations Across Generations
Guest Activist: Katherine Acey

  • Frances Kunreuther, Helen Kim, and Robby Rodriguez, Working Across Generations: Defining the Future of Nonprofit Leadership. New York: Jossey-Bass, 2008.
  • Ai-Jen Poo with Ariane Conrad, The Age of Dignity: Preparing for the Elder Boom in a Changing America. New York: The New Press, 2015.
  • Anna Bondoc and Meg Daly, Letters of Intent: Women Cross the Generations to Talk about Family, Work, Sex, Love and the Future of Feminism. New York: The Free Press, 1999.
  • Catherine Sameh and Suzanne Pharr, “If feminism has been absorbed by the larger culture, what purpose do feminist and lesbian projects serve? 42-51;
  • Eisa Nefartari Ulen and Angela Y. Davis, “What happened to your generation’s promise of ‘love and revolution”? 99-108;
  • Eisa Davis and Ntozake Shange, “If we’ve gotta live underground and everybody’s got cancer/will poetry be enuf?’ 189-99;
  • “Young Feminists Take on Activism and Organizing,” BCRW Podcast, 2013.

Week 8: October 25 – Art, Life and Trans Liberation
Guest Activist: Micah Bazant

Week 9: November 1 – Reclamation of Resilience: Transforming the Medical Industrial Complex
Guest Activist: Cara Page

  • Dorothy Roberts, Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction and the Meaning of Liberty. New York: Vintage, 1998. Chapters 2 & 7
  • Harriet A. Washington, Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present, 189-215. New York: Anchor Books, 2008.
  • Aurora Levins Morales, Kindling: Writings on the Body. Cambridge, Mass.: Palabra Press, 2013 [awaiting permission].

Week 10: November 8 – FALL BREAK – VOTE!

NOVEMBER 11 – PAPER #2 DUE – Effective Action 

Week 11: November 15 – #SayHerName: Resisting Police Violence against Women of Color
Guest Activist: Andrea Ritchie

Week 12: November 22 – RESEARCH WEEK – Individual meetings with professor

Week 13: November 29 – No One is Disposable
Guest Activist: Reina Gossett

Week 14: December – Four Pillars of Social Justice Infrastructure
Guest Activist: Dean Spade

  • Dean Spade, Normal Life: Administrative Violence, Trans Politics and the Limits of the Law. Boston: South End Press, 2011. Chapter 5.

DECEMBER 12, 5:00 p.m. FINAL PAPERS DUE – Acting on Your Issue

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Syllabus 2013

Theorizing Activism
WMS V 3312v
Fall 2013
Professor Janet Jakobsen, 101 Barnard Hall, jjakobsen@barnard.edu, Tu. 4-6
Professor Elizabeth Bernstein, 208 Barnard Hall, ebernstein@barnard.edu, Tu 4-6

Course Description

The goal of this course is to understand contemporary forms of activism that situate the politics of gender and sexuality in terms of broader economic and political currents, particularly those that have been analyzed under the term neoliberalism. As the central component of the seminar, students will participate in research conducted with community-based organizations in New York City that are working to address the effects of diverse economic and political transformations. Through our readings and conversations, we will trace the connections between the reallocation of various forms of capital, state agendas of incarceration and social reform, the politics of immigration, labor, and housing, new forms of gender inequality, and emergent forms of sexual violence and regulation. By partnering with organizations like SAKHI for South Asian Women, Queers for Economic Justice, the Hampshire College Civil Liberties and Public Policy project, the Sex Workers’ Outreach Project, and Sydnie L. Mosley Dance, students will also learn how to conduct research that is of use to the initiatives of local activists. In addition to sharing their results with their partner organizations, they will present their findings to senior scholars who are currently conducting research on homelessness, migration, drug policy and incarceration in the New York City area. Through their research, the students will explore the local impact of economic austerity, while situating these effects in the comparative and synthetic framework of the BCRW’s larger research project on Gender, Justice, and Neoliberal Transformations.

Learning Objectives

  • To be able to analyze modes of contemporary activism in terms of broader social currents—political, economic, and historical.
    To situate activism around gender and sexuality intersectionally, considering the impact of particular activist endeavors upon differently situated communities (including those that are stratified by class, age, race, and nation).
    To gain facility with critical research methods, especially ethnography and participatory action research, that will contribute to more effective social and political change.
    To gain an understanding of the intellectual work involved in activism.

Requirements:

  1. Class Participation: Attendance in class is required. Each student must read all of the assigned materials and be prepared to discuss them in class. In addition students are required to attend two related events that connect our work in class to activism in different media: 1) a conference on non-profit organizations at Columbia Law School on October 4 & 5.; 2) a field trip to Democracy Now on the morning of November 13. Students are required to write a one-page response paper for (at least) one panel discussion at this conference and for the Democracy Now fieldtrip. Any student who cannot participate in either of these events because of scheduling can arrange with the Professors to substitute another relevant event on campus. Students may also receive extra participation credit for writing response papers to any other event on campus that is relevant to the course. Response papers are required, but will not be graded. Class participation will be 20 points.
  2. Research Team: Each student must participate in a research team in conjunction with an activist organization working in collaborative partnership with the course. Students will indicate an order of preference for their projects in the second week of class and be matched with organizations by the instructors. Students will produce a participatory action research project with the organization over the course of the semester. They will present the results of their research projects in class on December 3 and will also have the opportunity to present their research to a transnational research team working with BCRW’s “Gender Justice” project at a conference at Barnard in Spring 2014. In addition to the presentation, the research project in conjunction with the class readings and discussion will serve as the basis for the students’ writing over the course of the semester. Students will meet with their research organizations at least three times over course of the semester, during weeks 3, and 13– more if needed for the project – and will turn in a team write-up (1-3 pages) of each meeting (5 points each – 15 points total).
  3. Papers: Each Student will write two short papers (5-7 pages) and one long paper (10-15 pages). The purpose of the papers is to apply the course material to the student’s research experience. The short papers will form the basis of class discussion on each of the days that they are due.
    • Paper #1, due October 1, will be an analysis of the student’s participatory action research project based on the readings to that point in the course. The papers will analyze the issue that is the focus of their research, providing necessary background for their project (15 points).
    • Paper #2, due November 12, begins the work of placing the work of the organization and the students’ research project in the context of broader social currents (15 points).
    • Final Group Paper, due December 6, will be a final report of the group’s research project with the contextual analysis framing or woven into the report. The form of the report will depend on the needs of the team’s organization (e.g., organizations may or may not be interested in the contextual analysis); and on the team’s decisions for how best to work together (e.g. the team can write in one conjoint voice or in separate voices). (25 points).
  4. Presentations: Each student will participate in a group presentation of the research team’s findings and conclusions. The group presentation will be in the final class session on December 3. 10 points.

Course Schedule

Week 1: September 3 – Introduction 

Week 2: September 10 – What Is Activism? 
Students choose preferences for organizational research project

  • Deboarh G. Martin, Susan Hanson and Danielle Fontaine, “What Counts as Activism?: The Role of Individuals in Creating Change,” WSQ: Women’s Studies Quarterly 35: 3&4 (Fall/Winter 2007): 78-94.
  • Dean Spade, “Methodologies of Trans Resistance,” in A Companion to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Studies, ed. George E. Haggerty and Molly McGarry, 237-61. Oxford, Blackwell, 2007.
  • Mandisa Mbali, “The Treatment Action Campaign and the History of Rights-Based, Patient-Drive HIV/AIDS Activism in South Africa,” Centre for Civil Society, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Research Report No. 29.
  • Ann Cvetkovich, An Archive of Feelings: Trauma, Sexuality and Lesbian Public Cultures. Durham: Duke University Press, 2003. Chapter 5.

Week 3: September 17 – Participatory Action Research 
Students placed in research teams and meet with organizational contacts during the week

  • Patricia Ticineto Clough and Michell Fine, “Activism and Pedagogies: Feminist Reflections,” WSQ: Women’s Studies Quarterly 35:3&4 (Fall/Winter 2007), pp 255-275.
  • Rebecca Jordan-Young, Lucy Trainor, and Janet R. Jakobsen, “Reproductive Justice in Action,” New Feminist Solutions Series. New York: Barnard Center for Research on Women and New York Women’s Foundation, 2010.
  • Different Avenues, “Move Along: Policing Sex Work in Washington DC,” 2008 (selections)

Week 4: Sept 24 – Methodological Nuts and Bolts: Interviews, Oral Histories, and Ethnography
Students report on meetings with organizational contacts. Team Write-Ups Due

  • Julia O’Connell Davidson and Derek Layder, Methods, Sex, and Madness, Routledge 1994: Chapters 4, 5, and 7.
  • Elizabeth Lapovsky Kennedy and Madeline Davis, “Constructing an Ethnohistory of the Buffalo Lesbian Community: Reflexivity, Dialogue, and Politics,” in Ellen Lewin and William Leap, eds., Out in the Field: Reflections of Lesbian and Gay Anthropologists.. University of Illinois Press, 1996.

Week 5: October 1 – Background Research on Issues
Paper #1 Due and In-Class Presentations

October 4 & 5: Queer Dreams and NonProfit Blues Conference Columbia Law School

Week 6: October 8 – Social Movements and NGOs
Conference Response Paper Due

  • Belinda Robnett. in How Long, How Long?: African-American Women in the Struggle for Civil Rights (Oxford, 1999. Chapters 1 & 11.
  • John D. McCarthy and Mayer N. Zald. “Resource Mobilization and Social Movements: A Partial Theory.” American Journal of Sociology 82:1212-1241 (1977).
  • Anu Sharma, Crossbreeding Institutions, Breeding Struggle: Women’s Empowerment Neoliberal Governmentality, and State Reformation in India, Cultural Anthropology, 22.1: 60-95.
  • Sonia Alvarez “Advocating Feminism: The Latin American NGO ‘Boom,” International Feminist Journal of Politics, 1:2 (September 1999): 191-209.

Week 7: October 15 – Neoliberalism as Context
Students meet with research organizations

Week 8: October 22 – Local Activism in the World
In-Class Discussion with Nobel Peace Prize Winner Leymah Gbowee
Small group meetings with Instructors to go over participatory action research projects.

  • Saskia Sassen, “A New Geography of Centers and Margins,” in LeGates and Stout, eds., The City Reader. Routledge, 1996: 69-77.
  • Neil Smith, Chapter 5: “Of Yuppies and Housing,” in The New Urban Frontier: Gentrification and the Revanchist City, Routledge, 1996: 92-119.
  • Alex Vitale, Chapter 3: “Defining Urban Liberalism” and Chapter 5: “Globalization and the Urban Crisis,” in City of Disorder: How the Quality of Life Campaign Transformed New York Politics, New York University Press, 2008: 54-69; 93-114.

Week 9: October 29 – Translocal Analysis and Organizing
Team Research Write-Ups Due

  • Barnard Center for Research on Women, Valuing Domestic Work.
  • Barnard Center for Research on Women and Queers for Economic Justice, Desiring Change.
  • Andrea Smith, “Looking into the Future: Domestic Violence, Women of Color, the State, and Social Change,” in Natalie Sokoloff and Brenda Smith, eds. Domestic Violence at the Margins: Readings on Race, Class, and Gender. Rutgers University Press, 2005: 416-435.
  • Melissa Sontag Broudo and Penelope Saunders, “Why are Sex Workers and their Allies Occupying Wall Street?” 2011.

Week 10: November 5 – FALL BREAK

Week 11: November 12 – Issues in Organizational and Political Context
Paper #2 and In-Class Presentations

November 13th: Class Visit to Democracy Now! (8 AM!)

Week 12: November 19 – Arts and Media Activism

  • M Castells, “Opening,” “Prelude to a Revolution,” “The Egyptian Revolution,” “The Rhizomatic Revolution,” and “Changing the World in a Network Society.”
  • JS Juris. “The New Digital Media and Activist Networking within Anti-Corporate Globalization Movements.” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 597:189-208 (2005).
  • J Earl and K Kimport, “Being Together versus Working Together: Copresence in Participation.” In Earl and Kimport, Digitally Enabled Social Change (MIT 2011).
  • J Skretney, “The Effect of the Cold War on Civil Rights: America and the World Audience.” Theory and Society 27: 237-85.
  • C Orenstein, “What is Festive-Revolutionary Theater” in The Politics of Popular Theater and the San Francisco Mime Troupe (U of Mississippi 1998)

Week 13: November 26 – Preparation for Final Presentation
Team Meetings and Meetings with Organizations to present findings

Week 14: December 3 – Research Team Presentations

DECEMBER 6, 5 PM – FINAL PAPERS DUE

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Activist Profiles

Katherine Acey is a Senior Activist Fellow Emerita, Director of Griot Circle, and former Executive Director of the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice. Watch a panel featuring Acey called “Activism in Context: Intergenerational Organizing in the Shadow of the 2016 Elections.” Read Acey’s Fellow profile.

Micah Bazant is a trans visual artist who works with social justice movements to reimagine the world. Among Bazant’s collaborations with BCRW include the Trans Life and Liberation Art Series, and an Oakland-based art exhibit and conversation called We Move Together: Disability Justice and Trans Liberation.

Reina Gossett is an activist, writer, and filmmaker, former membership director at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project and director of the Welfare Organizing Project at Queers for Economic Justice (QEJ). As an Activist-in-Residence with the BCRW Social Justice Institute and a former BCRW Activist Fellow (2013-2016), Gossett has collaborated on a vast number of projects, particularly activist-educational videos on trans liberation, disability justice, and prison abolition, many with collaborators CeCe McDonald and Dean Spade, including No One Is Disposable; Prisons Don’t Keep Us Safe, We Keep Each Other Safe; and I Use My Love to Guide Me: Surviving and Thriving in the Face of Impossible Situations. Read Gossett’s SJI Profile. 

Amber Hollibaugh is a Senior Activist Fellow Emerita, Director of Queer Survival Economies, and former Director of Queers for Economic Justice. Check out the Queer Survival Economies website to learn more about Hollibaugh’s work. Read Hollibaugh’s Fellow profile.

Cara Page is the Director of Programs at the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice, an Activist-in-Residence with the BCRW Social Justice Institute, and most recently the Executive Director of the Audre Lorde Project. She is working on a project to reclaim healing traditions of people of color and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, Two Spirit, and gender nonconforming people and transforming the medical industrial complex. Read Page’s SJI Profile. 

Tarso Ramos is the Executive Director of Political Research Associates (PRA) and an Activist-in-Residence with the BCRW Social Justice Institute. Check out PRA’s #First100Days Crash Course, resources designed to prepare activists and organizers for the first 100 days and beyond of the Trump administration, basedo n principles of collective resistance with tools for engaging the regime, defending human rights, and preventing authoritarianism. Read Ramos’s SJI profile.

Andrea Ritchie is a Researcher-in-Residence with the BCRW Social Justice Institute. She is also the author of Invisible No More: Resisting Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color in Troubled Times, and coauthor with Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw of “Say Her Name: Resisting Police Violence against Women of Color.” Watch the “Invisible No More” video, and read Ritchie’s SJI profile.

Dean Spade is a trans activist, legal scholar, and writer, founder and collective member of the Sylvia Rivera Law Project, former BCRW Activist Fellow (2014-2016) and current Activist-in-Residence in the BCRW Social Justice Institute. Spade has collaborated on numerous projects with BCRW, including activist-educational videos on queer and trans liberation, disability justice, and prison abolition, many in collaboration with Reina Gossett. Projects featured in Theorizing Activisms include “Queer Liberation: No Prisons, No Borders,” and “Prisons Aren’t Safe for Anybody.” Read Spade’s SJI profile.

Lewis Wallace is a writer, editor, multimedia journalist, and activist. One of Wallace’s collaborations with BCRW featured in Theorizing Activisms includes “Don’t Be a Bystander: 6 Tips for Responding to Racist Attacks.”

Faculty Profiles

Janet Jakobsen is the Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Barnard College. Read Jakobsen’s full Faculty Profile.

Elizabeth Bernstein is Professor of Women’s Studies and Sociology. Read Bernstein’s full Faculty Profile.

 

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